5 Simple Ways to Engage Your Child Through Social Stories

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According to Barker, J. (2001), people with autism often have language and attention issues which interfere with their ability to learn from verbal explanations alone. Visual aids, becomes a useful tool to back up verbal explanation.

This is because visual pictures (p.xiii)

  1. can make abstract verbal concepts more concrete
  2. remain stable over time while auditory information can be missed as students’ attention fluctuates, and
  3. provide a more powerful means to engage attention

I first talk about the ‘The Social Skills Picture Book‘ in June last year when I first started out my blog. This book, by Barker, uses a visual strategy to teach social skills.

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How to Teach Social Language Part 7 – Finding out about someone #1

According to Freeman, (1996, p.34), the “Finding Out” activity is a vital activity to teach our children with autism as most of our children do no the language ability to ask appropriate questions of peers. When they are interested in a peer, they face difficulty in finding the ‘right’ words to form a question.

By teaching social script (i.e., Finding out about someone), the child is given the opportunity to internalize these questions so he or she have the tools to be social in a verbal manner.

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How to Teach Social Language Part 3 – Increasing General Knowledge #3 using listening

This is a series of social language activities that I am teaching my child to equip him with the necessary skills to help him to understand, retain and converse with others.

The child should have mastered the following activities before engaging in this one:

How to Teach Social Language Part 1 – Turn-taking

How to Teach Social Language Part 2-Joint Attention”It’s a…”, “This is a…”, “I have a…”

This activity is taught concurrently with:

How to Teach Social Language Part 3 -Increasing General Knowledge #1

How to Teach Social Language Part 3 -Increasing General Knowledge #2 ‘Fill-in-the-blanks’ & Teaching Calendar

Objectives:

  • To engage in conversation with the child
  • To build on the concept of ‘today’ & days of the week
  • To build on listening skills

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How to Teach Social Language Part 4 – Sequencing ‘Before and After’

Importance of teaching sequencing

If your child has autism, one common scenario you will face is your child being unable to provide you with the answer to, “What did you do in school today?”. Often with C, he would say a list of random things which seemed to relate to one another but at the same time, it doesn’t seem to be. Many children with autism have yet to grasp the concept that everything happens in relation to everything else. While they are able to memorize certain places, directions or numbers, etc well, they seem to have difficulty in piecing them together.

This is a series of activities that I will be adding along the way once my child has master the the concept (objective/s) of the lesson.

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How to Teach Social Language Part 1 – Turn-taking

Teaching social language is paramount, as pointed out by Dr Freeman, author of Teach Me Language, a language manual for children with autism, Asperger’s syndrome and related developmental disorders. Eventually, we are hoping, through the intervention, the child is able to understand, internalize, and recall basic information which will effectively assist them to hold conversations with others.

This is a series of activities that I will be adding along the way once my child has master the the concept (objective/s) of the lesson.

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