Science Adventures Kinder Books_The Flat Battery

As I have mentioned before, I am not a Science person but I do agree that Science has a lot of valuable and interesting concepts for a child to learn and know. I was introduced to this series of books on Science topics and one of the reasons I love it is because they use speech bubbles and dialogues to convey their Science theory which makes it easier for preschoolers to understand what they are reading. This is one of the lessons that I have conducted with C, and he has been asking to read the book every lesson. It is a worthwhile investment for parents like me who has a hard time understanding and teaching Science to their kids, and it is an awesome simple read for kids to find out about Scientific concepts.

Materials needed:
Materials needed: White Board or PECS board to indicate the lesson plan for the day; Portable fan or clock; Batteries of different sizes; Science Adventures Kinder Science Book 5

The Flat Battery – the story is between a brother and a sister. The sister discovers that her alarm clock isn’t working and she asks her brother for assistance. The brother goes on to teach the sister about the name and sizes of batteries and even provides pictorial cues on how to fix a broken clock by changing its batteries.

  1. Read the story to the child. If child is able, you can take on the different characters in the book.
    Read the story to the child. If child is able, you can take on the different characters in the book.
  2. Show the child the different battery sizes and codes as you read the book on it.
  3. When complete, tell the child we are going to fix a portable fan now.
  4. Show the child the inside of the fan and ask if it contains the piece of bronze of spring.
    Show the child the inside of the fan and ask if it contains the piece of bronze of spring. To build on his OT skills as well, I got C to open the cover to insert the battery but that did take quite a bit of time.
  5. Ask the child which of the battery sizes will fit the portable fan. C tried to fit in size AAA but soon realised that the battery will fall out. You can see that I have used the book as reference for him.
    Ask the child which of the battery sizes will fit the portable fan. C tried to fit in size AAA but soon realised that the battery will fall out. You can see that I have used the book as reference for him.
  6. If you have a pack of unopened batteries, get the child to open it. That will train the strength of their fingers.
    If you have a pack of unopened batteries, get the child to open it. That will train the strength of their fingers, and coordinating to hold the pack on one hand, and opening with the other.
  7. Get child to on the fan to show that it is working.
    Get child to on the fan to show that it is working. C was really happy that he got the fan working that he went out of the room to tell B about it excitedly!
  8. Word Association
    When we were done with the lesson’s activities, I continued with a word association activity with C. (This suggestion came from C’s speech therapist as I mentioned to her that I was puzzled why he couldn’t tell her about the cookies-making session. She suggested for me to conduct word association or topic sentence with C after any hands-on activity to aid memory) I wrote down three items for him to choose from. They are items 1, 2 and 5 from his lesson plan.
  9. Ask the child what he wants to talk about. In this case, C chose to talk about
    Ask the child what he wants to talk about. In this case, C chose to talk about how he fixed the portable fan. These sentences came from C and I thought they were awesome!
  10. Jpeg
    This is a recap on the flat battery we did the following day. He could still remember most of the story.

Reflection

I am really liking this series of books. It is a time saver and lesson filler for me. Nowadays, when I am preparing from activity one to two, I can actually pass one of the books to C, and he will sit there quietly and flip through the book. Before, there have been many moments whereby I will lose him to the oscillating fan, toy or running out of the room, etc before I can carry out my next activity. As a result, I will need to call after him to return before we can commence with the lesson.

So far, the topic or word association technique after each hands-on activity is working well with C. It is more time-consuming to add another activity but seeing how C is able to remember more, and when prompted, is able to converse in longer sentences with me, I’m willing. Hopefully this will continue and we can soon move on to talking without the visual cues by the end of the year. *cross-fingers*

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