How to Teach Social Language Part 4 – Sequencing ‘Before and After’

Importance of teaching sequencing

If your child has autism, one common scenario you will face is your child being unable to provide you with the answer to, “What did you do in school today?”. Often with C, he would say a list of random things which seemed to relate to one another but at the same time, it doesn’t seem to be. Many children with autism have yet to grasp the concept that everything happens in relation to everything else. While they are able to memorize certain places, directions or numbers, etc well, they seem to have difficulty in piecing them together.

This is a series of activities that I will be adding along the way once my child has master the the concept (objective/s) of the lesson.

Multisensory technique

I believe in using multisensory teaching technique (You may read more about it here.) when engaging C. I think this is an effective method in teaching any child, therefore in all my lessons, I try to have a combination of activities which involve visual, auditory, kinesthetic and tactile elements. While I think it would be useful to have all the elements in every single activity, my brain juices just don’t work at creating such lessons all the time.

Jpeg

Objective:

  • Introduction to the concept of sequencing using ‘before’ and ‘after’

Materials needed:

  • Paper
  • Pencil
  • I bought this from an education fair.
    I bought this from an education fair at $20 for two boxes. The first teaches sequence, the second teaches spelling.

 

Instructions:

  1. Show the child the first set of sequence card, ‘1-2-3’ (not put in sequence) (Note: The reason why I chose this set is because C’s strength is in numbers.)
  2. Instruct the child to put the cards in order. When completed, remember to praise the child.
  3. Write the numbers 1 to 9 on a piece of paper including the ‘before’ and ‘after’ words and the direction arrows (as shown in the image above)
  4. Using the sequence cards as a visual cue, point to number 2, and ask the child what comes after ‘2’. If the child is uncertain, you may guide him verbally and direct his fingers from ‘2’ to ‘3’ saying, “After 2 is 3”.
  5. Using the paper with numbers 1 to 9, ask the child, what comes after ‘3’. Repeat the same procedure and process as instruction (4), saying, “After 3 is 4”.
  6. Once the child has sort of gotten the concept of after, you may proceed with giving the child another set of sequence card repeat the instructions 1, 2 and 4.
  7. Repeat the same process for teaching ‘After’. (C is pretty quick at understanding ‘before’, so I proceeded to teach ‘before’ within the lesson as well. You might want to leave the teaching of ‘before’ to the next lesson if the child is unable to grasp the concept of ‘after’.)

Done.

We moved on to Let’s listen to a story_Seed to flower.

Reflection

C was able to grasp the concept of ‘after’ pretty quickly. He got a bit iffy when I was teaching ‘before’ but still managed to provide me with the answers to the questions that I gave him. I think part of the reason has to do with he really likes numbers and using numbers definitely helped in the completion of the task.

Other social language related activities that we have done:

How to Teach Social Language Part 1 – Turn-taking

How to Teach Social Language Part 2-“It’s a…”, “This is a…”, “I have a…”

How to Teach Social Language Part 3 -Increasing General Knowledge #1

How to Teach Social Language Part 3 -Increasing General Knowledge #2 ‘Fill-in-the-blanks’ & Teaching Calendar

How to Teach Social Language Part 3 – Increasing General Knowledge #3 using listening

How to Teach Social Language Part 5 – Use Listening to Teach Sequence

How to Teach Social Language Part 6 – Simple Word Association

How to Teach Social Language Part 7 – Finding out about someone #1

How to Teach Social Language Part 8 – Finding out about someone #2

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6 thoughts on “How to Teach Social Language Part 4 – Sequencing ‘Before and After’

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